Family Obligation and Assistance during Adolescence: Contextual Variations and Developmental Implications

By William Damon; Andrew J. Fuligni | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
EDITOR’S NOTES1
Andrew J. Fuligni
1. Work Contributions to the Family: Developing a5
Conceptual and Research Framework  Jacqueline J. Goodnow, Jeanette A. Lawrence  The study of work contributions to the family should pay attention to  differences in the type of contributions made, the impact of various cir cumstances, and the feelings people express about such contributions.
2. Household Chores: Under What Conditions23
Do Mothers Lean on Daughters?  Ann C. Crouter, Melissa R. Head, Matthew F. Bumpus, Susan M. McHale  Daughters bear the brunt of extra housework when mothers work in  demanding jobs, even when they have older brothers who might be  expected to share in the work because of their greater level of maturity.
3. Extended Schooling, Adolescence, and the43
Renegotiation of Responsibility Among Italian Immigrant  Families in New Haven, Connecticut, 1910–1940  Stephen Lassonde  The American introduction of universal secondary schooling in the early  twentieth century collided with traditional notions of family responsi bility among southern Italian immigrants, who expected their adoles cents to work in order to contribute to the subsistence of the family.
4. Family Obligation and the Academic Motivation61
of Adolescents from Asian, Latin American, and  European Backgrounds  Andrew J. Fuligni  Adolescents from Asian and Latin American families in the United  States have a strong sense of obligation to the family, and their sense of  familial duty is associated with a specific belief in the importance and  usefulness of education.
5. Children Investing in Their Families: The Importance of77
Child Obligation in Successful Development  Thomas S. Weisner  The findings of the previous chapters are discussed in terms of the role  that youths’ obligations play in the overall adaptive strategies of families.
INDEX85

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