International Financial Governance under Stress: Global Structures versus National Imperatives

By Geoffrey R.D Underhill; Xiaoke Zhang | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This volume began life as an international conference (‘What Is to Be Done? Global Economic Disorder and Policies for a New Financial Architecture in the Millennium’, 3–5 February 2000) in Amsterdam. It was directed by Geoffrey Underhill and Karel van Wolferen and organised by the Research Centre for International Political Economy (RECIPE, now integrated into the Amsterdam School for Social Science Research or ASSR) and the Institute for Comparative Political and Economic Institutions (ICPEI), both at the Universiteit van Amsterdam (UvA). The conference was designed to address the various problems that global market integration and recent episodes of financial crises presented to public and private authorities at the national, regional and global levels. The underlying premise was that the policy debate on global financial architecture issues was lacking in important regards. It brought together a global and interdisciplinary selection of scholars and a range of practitioners from the public and private sectors alike. It provided an important forum for both academic and policy discussions across disciplinary and professional boundaries. The emphasis, as the title suggests, was on what should be done, an important part of which concerned the correct identification of the problem.

The conference received financial support from a range of internal and external sources. These were: the faculties of Economics and Econometrics and of Social and Behavioural Sciences (UvA); the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences (KNAW), Asia House (Amsterdam), De Nederlandsche Bank, the New York-based Reinventing Bretton Woods Committee (Director: Marc Uzan), the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the ASSR. Paul van de Velde, from the ICPEI, and Helge Lasschuijt, headed the conference secretariat, which was central to the successful organisation of the conference. The conference participants and volume editors are most grateful to organisers and fundraisers alike for their enthusiasm and generosity. Karel van Wolferen, director of the ICPEI, was not only a skilful planner of

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