Transboundary Damage in International Law

By Xue Hanqin | Go to book overview

CAMBRIDGE STUDIES IN INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW

Established in 1946, this series produces high quality scholarship in the fields of public and private international law and comparative law. Although these are distinct legal sub-disciplines, developments since 1946 confirm their interrelation.

Comparative law is increasingly used as a tool in the making of law at national, regional, and international levels. Private international law is now often affected by international conventions, and the issues faced by classical conflicts rules are frequently dealt with by substantive harmonization of law under international auspices. Mixed international arbitrations, especially those involving State economic activity, raise mixed questions of public and private international law, while in many fields (such as the protection of human rights and democratic standards, investment guarantees and international criminal law) international and national systems interact. National constitutional arrangements relating to “foreign affairs,” and to the implementation of international norms, are a focus of attention.

Professor Sir Robert Jennings edited the series from 1981. Following his retirement as General Editor, an editorial board has been created and Cambridge University Press has recommitted itself to the series, affirming its broad scope.

The Board welcomes works of a theoretical or interdisciplinary character, and those focusing on new approaches to international or comparative law or conflicts of law. Studies of particular institutions or problems are equally welcome, as are translations of the best work published in other languages.

General EditorsJames Crawford SC FBA
Whewell Professor of International Law, Faculty of Law and
Director, Lauterpacht Research Centre for International Law,
University of Cambridge
John S. Bell FBA
Professor of Law, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge
Editorial BoardProfessor Hilary Charlesworth University of Adelaide
Professor Lori Damrosch Columbia University Law School
Professor John Dugard University of Leiden
Professor Mary-Ann Glendon Harvard Law School
Professor Christopher Greenwood London School of Economics
Professor David Johnston University of Edinburgh
Professor Hein Kötz Max-Planck-Institut, Hamburg
Professor Donald McRae University of Ottawa
Professor Onuma Yasuaki University of Tokyo
Professor Reinhard Zimmermann Universität Regensburg
Advisory CommitteeProfessor D. W. Bowett QC
Judge Rosalyn Higgins QC
Professor Sir Robert Jennings QC
Professor J. A. Jolowicz QC
Professor Sir Elihu Lauterpacht CBE QC
Professor Kurt Lipstein
Judge Stephen Schwebel

A list of books in the series can be found at the end of this volume.

-ii-

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Transboundary Damage in International Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Cambridge Studies in International and Comparative Law ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xiii
  • List of Treaties xvi
  • List of Cases xxvi
  • Abbreviations xxviii
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • Part I- Accidental Damage 17
  • 2- Liability for Accidental Damage 19
  • 3- Substantive Rules and Principles: Issues and Problems 73
  • Part II- Non-Accidental Damage 111
  • 4- Liability for Non-Accidental Damage 113
  • 5- The Doctrine of Due Diligence and Standards of Conduct 162
  • Part III- Damage to the Global Commons 189
  • 6- Liability for Damage to the Global Commons 191
  • 7- Legal Issues Relating to Damage to the Global Commons 236
  • Part IV- Underlying Principles 267
  • 8- The Nature and Basis of International Liability 269
  • 9- Conclusions 317
  • Bibliography 333
  • Index 356
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