Sacred Custodians of the Earth? Women, Spirituality, and the Environment

By Alaine Low; Soraya Tremayne | Go to book overview

3
Sacred Landscapes: Religion
and the Natural Environment
in the Classical World

Elena Kingdon

The Greeks had no sacred books. Information about religion is gleaned from the works of poets in hymns, epics and tragedy. Homer defined the Olympic gods through the vicissitudes of the Trojan war and Odysseus’s wanderings. Hesiod was a farmer-poet from Boeotia who, as he tells us, was impelled by the Muses to sing about the family of gods before time began. The narrative that follows is therefore interspersed with quotations to illustrate how the Greeks viewed their gods, goddesses and the natural environments.

Greek women, with few exceptions, as portrayed in the literature, were silent and belonged to the elite, being the wives, mothers and daughters of Athenian citizens. What is known about their lives, feelings and work was written by men, whose thoughts about women were dictated by socio-political mores and private prejudice. Nonetheless, women were essential to the performance of key rituals that ensured human and land fertility. In both Greek and Roman religion there were women priestesses. Women’s link with the Earth was acknowledged by Athenian society, but fell short of any concept of ‘custodianship’. What is more relevant, from a contemporary viewpoint, is that, among the attitudes towards the Earth and its resources in both the Athenian and Roman high culture, one can detect the beginnings of that pride in man’s technological achievements which has animated so many endeavours in Western technological civilization.

This chapter is in two sections. The first illustrates some Greek

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sacred Custodians of the Earth? Women, Spirituality, and the Environment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.