The Beautiful Burial in Roman Egypt: Art, Identity, and Funerary Religion

By Christina Riggs | Go to book overview

THREE
Portraying the Dead

As the preceding chapter demonstrated for sites as diverse as Thebes, Kharga Oasis, and Akhmim, Egyptian ideas about the afterlife guided the representation of the dead in funerary art. Verbal and iconographic comparisons to deities like Osiris and Hathor presaged the god-like qualities the dead would attain after their mummification, judgement, and rebirth. Further, linking the funerary image to a specific aspect of the deceased—namely, his or her sex—bridged the life and death of the individual. This concern with the survival of individual and social roles might have contributed to a trend increasingly observed in funerary art of the Ptolemaic and early Roman Periods, whereby the representation of the deceased included more ‘everyday’ details, such as jewellery, clothes, varied face and body shapes, and natural hair rather than wigs or head-dresses. These details supplanted the old-fashioned, pharaonic representation of the living to emphasize the transfiguration of the dead. Although the possibility that contact with Greek art in the Ptolemaic Period encouraged the use of ‘everyday’ details cannot be excluded, Egyptian art had a long history of contrasting archaic and contemporary norms of personal appearance. In a sense, it was the inclusion of contemporary elements in Egyptian funerary images that paved the way for the use of Greek-form images, and in the Roman Period, funerary art displayed a marked preference for naturalistically painted or sculpted images of the deceased drawn from portrait models in the Roman world. How this artistic change took hold, and to what extent it reflected social changes, is the subject of this chapter, which considers the variety of ways in which the dead were represented in Roman Egypt, especially in the first and second centuries AD.


THE HUMAN FIGURE IN GREEK AND EGYPTIAN ART

The difference between a conceptual image with some quotidian elements, like clothing and jewellery, and an illusionistic one, where the living individual seems to have been captured in plaster and paint, ultimately derived from the difference between Egyptian representational art and Greek and Roman art. The Greek artistic system equated visual observation with pictorial representation, attempting at its

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Beautiful Burial in Roman Egypt: Art, Identity, and Funerary Religion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Colour Plates xix
  • Abbreviations xx
  • Note on Names and Transliteration xxii
  • One Introduction - Art, Identity, and Funerary Religion 1
  • Two - Osiris, Hathor, and the Gendered Dead 41
  • Three - Portraying the Dead 95
  • Four - Art and Archaism in Western Thebes 175
  • Five Conclusions - The 'Beautiful Burial' in Roman Egypt 245
  • Appendix - List of Objects 257
  • Bibliography 302
  • Register of Museums 323
  • General Index 331
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.