Chasing the Wind: Regulating Air Pollution in the Common Law State

By Noga Morag-Levine | Go to book overview

Preface

TO MOST READERS of this book, localized air pollution concentrations, or “hotspots,” are familiar only as momentary waves of caustic fumes encountered while driving past refineries, steel mills, chemical manufacturers, pulp mills, or other heavy industrial sites. But for the millions of Americans who live in close proximity to these pollution sources, such fumes are a constant intrusion and a persistent source of worry. “Noxious vapours” was the Victorian term for these gases and their multiple sensory assaults. Since the beginning of industrialization, some of those exposed to these vapors have attributed to them a long and consistent set of symptoms and concerns—nausea, vomiting, headaches, stinging throats, constricted chests, burning eyes, and a vague but persistent concern about long-term health effects. The seed of this book was such a worry.

Soon after moving into an Albany, California, apartment, my family noticed the intermittent presence of burnt plastic-like fumes that left an irritating, caustic sensation in the eyes and nose, and a bitter taste in the mouth. The fumes would come and go with the wind, and vary in their intensity. The parents of two young children, my husband and I soon became concerned that the air might be harmful, and we began to inquire as to the fumes’ source. After a number of false starts, we were referred to the regional air pollution agency, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) and contacted its complaint hotline. The agency registered our complaint under “odors” and sent an inspector, who informed us that the fumes came from a steel foundry located less than a mile away. The fumes were created by the rapid heating of synthetic resins during the metal-casting process, and—as we would later learn—included the emission of benzene, phenol, formaldehyde, and other hazardous air pollutants. We were told that for the Air District to take action, it must first establish that the odor amounted to a “public nuisance.” Under district rules, this required, as a first step, that complaints from five separate households be confirmed within a twenty-four hour period.

Encouraged by the prospect of pollution abatement, we began to call and register complaints. Although the agency responded diligently to each such complaint, we found that we often were unable to have our complaints confirmed. In the interval between our phone call and the arrival of the inspector, the odor often disappeared as a result of shifts in wind direction or in the foundry’s production processes. The inspector would arrive and sniff the air but neither she nor I could detect any trace of the

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chasing the Wind: Regulating Air Pollution in the Common Law State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 259

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.