Notes

Introduction

1. MacCormick, “Beyond the Sovereign State,” 18.

2. Naím, “Five Wars of Globalization,” 29.

3. Flynn, “America The Vulnerable,” 60.

4. Sanger, “The World: When Laws Don’t Apply; Cracking Down on the TerrorArms Trade,” New York Times, 15 June 2003, Sect. 4, 4.

5. Chote, “A World in the Woods,” Financial Times, 2 November 1998, 20.

6. The Financial Stability Forum was initiated by the finance ministers and central bank governors of the Group of Seven (G-7) industrial countries in February 1999, following a report on international cooperation and coordination in the area of financial market supervision and surveillance by the president of the Deutsche Bundesbank. In addition to representatives from the Basel Committee, IOSCO, and the International Association of Insurance Supervisors (IAIS), its members include senior representatives from national authorities responsible for financial stability in significant international financial centers; international financial institutions such as the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), the IMF, the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the World Bank; and committees of central bank experts. “A Guide to Committees, Groups and Clubs,” on on the International Monetary Fund homepage (cited 7 July 2003); available from http://imf.org/external/np/exr/facts/ groups.htm#FSF.

7. American readers may be skeptical of these reports due to the widespread and completely false statistic about how few members of Congress have a passport. In fact, 93 percent of all members hold passports and average two trips abroad a year. Indeed, 20 percent claim to speak a foreign language. Eric Schmitt and Elizabeth Becker, “In-

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A New World Order
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • One - Regulators: the New Diplomats 36
  • Two - Judges: Constructing a Global Legal System 65
  • Three - Legislators: Lagging behind 104
  • Four - A Disaggregated World Order 131
  • Five - An Effective World Order 166
  • Six - A Just World Order 216
  • Conclusion 261
  • Notes 273
  • Bibliography 319
  • Index 333
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