Authors of Their Lives: The Personal Correspondence of British Immigrants to North America in the Nineteenth Century

By David A. Gerber | Go to book overview

Index
“1.5 generation,” 202, 279
1798 Rebellion in Ireland, 137
Abandonment of family, 98, 193
Accuracy of personal letters, 9–10, 49
Adventure narratives, 324–6
African Americans, 42
Aging, 114–15, 133–4, 185, 208–11
Akenson, Donald Harmon, 39
Alabama, 105
Albany (New York), 283
Alcoholism/heavy drinking, 193, 287, 288
Alienation, 204, 342n26
Altman, Janet Gurkin, 95, 100, 142
Amanuenses, 88–9, 208–9
American evangelicals, 311
American nativism, 18, 271
American Revolution, 47
American sociology, 33–40, 55
Americans: anti-Irish prejudice, 272; to Archbald (Mary), 26, 303, 305–8; to British immigrants, 20, 23–8; John Bull compared to, 25; materialism, 25, 284, 303, 310; religiosity of, 25; to Steel (Thomas), 310, 311
Anderson, Benedict, 66
Anglo-American Loyalists, 18
Anti-behaviorist psychology, 68
Anti-Catholicism, 18, 20–3, 271–4, 342n27
Anti-Irish prejudice, 18, 20–3, 271–4
Antrim (Ireland), 17, 89, 109, 110, 133
Apologies in letters, 138, 194, 195, 326
Archbald family, 282–3, 284
Archbald, Helen Louisa (Louisa, Mary Ann’s daughter): after father’s death, 307; as companion to Mary Ann, 209–10; illegitimacy, 295, 388n43; occupation, 209–10; resemblance to Mary Ann, 284; in Scotland, 282; son (George), 111, 295, 359n32, 388n43
Archbald, Hugh (Mary Ann’s great-grand- son), 294, 295
Archbald, James, III (Mary Ann’s hus- band): children, 284; courtship, 288; death, 209, 285, 307; drinking, 288; early life, 287; education, 288; emigra- tion decision, 284–5; Englinton and, 282; epitaph, 285; farms (Creekvale, Riverbank), 296, 297, 304; Little Cum- brae, 282; as a poor relation, 287; resi- dence, 161; return migration, 293–4, 305; Scottishness, 306; success, 285; writing skills, 296
Archbald, James, IV (Jamie; Mary Ann’s son), 23, 209, 282, 296, 302, 305–6, 307
Archbald, Margaret (Mary Ann’s daugh- ter), 209, 282, 297
Archbald, Mary Ann Wodrow, 281–308; aging’s effects, 209–10; Americans to, 26, 303, 305–8; changes in postal sys- tems, 161, 173–4; children, 114, 284; closing letters, 172; cohorts, 335; copy- books, 84, 293; custodial and parenting obligations, 388n35; diarylike letters, 171; family scandal, 294–5, 388n43; farming, 123, 173; Irish Catholics, 23; last archived letter, 210; literacy level, 84; Louisa as companion, 209–10; need to correspond, 228; New Year’s Eve let- ter, 174, 176, 286, 299–300, 302, 390n53; personal couriers, 107; place of letters in her life, 210, 292; as a poor relation, 287; post office, 151, 297, 389n49; religious orientation, 25, 290;

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