Credit Risk: Pricing, Measurement, and Management

By David Lando | Go to book overview

Preface

In September 2002 I was fortunate to be on the scientific committee of a conference in Venice devoted to the analysis of corporate default and credit risk modeling in general. The conference put out a call for papers and received close to 100 submissions—an impressive amount for what is only a subfield of financial economics. The homepage www.defaultrisk.com, maintained by Greg Gupton, has close to 500 downloadable working papers related to credit risk. In addition to these papers, there are of course a very large number of published papers in this area.

These observations serve two purposes. First, they are the basis of a disclaimer: this book is not an encyclopedic treatment of all contributions to credit risk. I am nervously aware that I must have overlooked important contributions. I hope that the overwhelming amount of material provides some excuse for this. But I have of course also chosen what to emphasize. The most important purpose of the book is to deliver what I think are the central themes of the literature, emphasizing “the basic idea,” or the mathematical structure, one must know to appreciate it. After this, I hope the reader will be better at tackling the literature on his or her own. The second purpose of my introductory statistics is of course to emphasize the increasing popularity of the research area.

The most important reasons for this increase, I think, are found in the financial industry. First, the Basel Committee is in the process of formulating Basel II, the revision of the Basel Capital Accord, which among other things reforms the way in which the solvency requirements for financial institutions are defined and what good risk-management practices are. During this process there has been tremendous focus on what models are really able to do in the credit risk area at this time. Although it is unclear at this point precisely what Basel II will bring, there is little doubt that it will leave more room for financial institutions to develop “internal models” of the risk of their credit exposures. The hope that these models will better account for portfolio effects and direct hedges and therefore in turn lower the capital requirements has led banks to devote a significant proportion of their resources to credit risk modeling efforts. A second factor is the booming market for creditrelated asset-backed securities and credit derivatives which present a new “land of opportunity” for structural finance. The development of these markets is also largely driven by the desire of financial institutions to hedge credit exposures. Finally, with (at least until recently) lower issuance rates for treasury securities and low yields, corporate bond issues have gained increased focus from fund managers.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Credit Risk: Pricing, Measurement, and Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 310

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.