Early Christianity and Classical Culture: Comparative Studies in Honor of Abraham J. Malherbe

By Abraham Johannes Malherbe | Go to book overview

THE ART OF PRAISE
PHILO AND PHILODEMUS ON MUSK;

Everett Ferguson


Introduction: The Silence of Ancient Sounds

Of all the cultural expressions of the early Jewish and Christian world, perhaps the least heard by modern scholars has been music. But music was all around in the classical world—from the streets to the imperial salon. It was also the subject of extensive technical discussions, especially among philosophers. Two of these, those of Philodemus and Philo, will be the focus of this study. Both give attention to music: Philodemus by a treatise on the subject and Philo by numerous scattered references, but neither author’s treatment has attracted extensive analysis. While Abe Malherbe has professed little affinity for Philo, I hope he will accept this study as a melodius tribute, by allowing the tenor of Philo to harmonize with the bass of Philodemus, one of the favorites in his classical chorus.

The neglect of music by scholars may be a result of where one typically encounters it in the extant literary sources. Music, like medicine, grammar, and rhetoric, was considered a

a learned “skill” or “art.” From the classical Greek tradition it was given stature by its connection to the poetic composition of odes and hymns. Even so, by the Roman period it was not considered an appropriate profession for a person of noble birth. Poetry was now a separate literary art, and music had largely become the province of slaves or women. Unlike rhetoric, elite men were not expected to study music for use in daily life, even though many show substantial awareness of its technical aspects. Jewish and Christian texts give even less attention usually, perhaps because music was often associated with less wholesome activities of the after-dinner entertainment at a symposium. Such carousing with female musicians was to be avoided. Among the moralist philosophers, however, one frequently finds allusions to music and its technical skills as a metaphor or illustration of the precision and practice of pursuing a harmonius moral life. In the arts, skill and training are required to become proficient, as Musonius Rufus said:

-391-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Early Christianity and Classical Culture: Comparative Studies in Honor of Abraham J. Malherbe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 748

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.