Majesty in Canada: Essays on the Role of Royalty

By Colin M. Coates | Go to book overview

Introduction: Majesty in Canada

COLIN M. COATES

In the twenty-first century, Canada’s connection to the British monarchy attracts both fervent support and stiff opposition. Whatever the attitudes to the British royal family at the present, in the Canadian past, the monarchy played a significant — often a central — cultural and political role. In May 2002, the Centre of Canadian Studies at the University of Edinburgh held its annual conference on the theme of the role of monarchy in Canadian history and culture. The fiftieth anniversary of Queen Elizabeth’s ascension to the throne provided the occasion for an exploration of the many contributions of monarchic principles to Canada. Delegates from the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and New Zealand examined many aspects of the issues.1

Given its geographical distance from the throne, Canada’s connection to royalty was often experienced through the personal representatives of the monarch. Governors General wielded significant political, financial, and cultural power into the twentieth century, and in various ways they attempted to ensure Canadians’ allegiance to the throne. Royal and vice-regal tours assumed a large civic importance, providing a link of loyalty that tied together the disparate and regionalized country. On numerous occasions, many Canadians rushed to proclaim their fealty to the monarch, even if these expressions often served very different purposes. In contrast, republicanism remained a relatively minor theme in Canadian politics.2 In 2002, then Minister of External Affairs and Deputy Prime Minister John Manley openly articulated his beliefs about abolishing Canada’s ties to the monarchy,3 but such perspectives have never had the degree of support here that they do in Australia.

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Majesty in Canada: Essays on the Role of Royalty
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 281

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.