Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

By Rebecca Flemming | Go to book overview

NOTES TO THE READER

SINCE this book is intended to be accessible to those who are not classical scholars, and who may be unfamiliar with classical languages and the various conventions of scholarly presentation in the field, and also both deals with some material that may well not be familiar even to those in the discipline, and takes some liberties with those conventions, it is worth outlining the various presentational principles and practices adopted here in more detail than is usual.


Terminology and Translation

Any study of ancient medicine, or any associated ancient discipline, confronts the problem of how to deal, in a way that is clear and accessible but not misleading, with the Greek and Latin technical vocabulary involved, and the long dead, but vitally important, concepts which are signified by it. Throughout the book I provide both the original text and my own translation of any quotations from ancient works, as both are equally essential; but there is also the question of how certain words or phrases are to be rendered, and how they are to appear outside the context of specific citation. I have, therefore, largely opted to preserve the most important of such terms, and the ones most prone to modernizing distortion in translation, in something like their original form: to transliterate from the Greek, or keep the Latin as appropriate, and to explain the meaning at the first occurrence, but simply reproduce the original term thereafter. These key terms, their meanings and derivation, are then collected, for reference, in the Glossary.


Authors, Titles, and their Abbreviation

The titles of ancient works, particularly medical works, are often rather unsettled, appearing in various versions in different manuscripts, none, or all, of which may accord with the

-viii-

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