Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

By Rebecca Flemming | Go to book overview

3
The Medical Woman between
Folk Tradition and Philosophy

IT is a varied assortment of texts which come under scrutiny in this chapter; none the less, the features they share make their juxtaposition productive. The literary works of members of the Roman aristocracy rub shoulders with those of Greek freedmen, favoured court physicians, and an ex-soldier, as well as those claiming to be written by kings or dictated by gods. Each was composed at a particular point within a wider pattern of complex cultural interactions. None the less, almost all these texts were written primarily for the same audience, the educated élite of the Roman empire as it was concentrated in its capital, though some of their authors do so from inside that élite and others from a more or less distant outside. All were also attempting to organize and present forms of medical knowledge, drawing for the main part on the traditions of Hellenistic iatrikē again, either from somewhere within those traditions themselves, or somewhere outside them. Woman is caught up in this exchange, is part of these projects, in a number of different ways.


TEXTS, AUTHORS, AND WOMEN

The text with the broadest medical scope in this assortment is that of A. Cornelius Celsus, written most probably during the reign of Tiberius.1 Originally part of a much larger work entitled simply, The Arts (Artes), the eight books On Medicine were intended to provide a synthetic account of all that men of the Roman élite should know about the medical art, alongside

1 For a general introduction to author and text, with further bibliography, see e.g. Guy Serbat’s introduction to vol. I of the Budé edition of Celsus (Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1995), pp. viii-lxxv.

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 453

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.