Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

By Rebecca Flemming | Go to book overview

4
Sects and the Medical Woman

THE original hairesis, that of the empirikoi, and the more recent, but just as committed hairesis of the methodikoi, remained robustly intact in the early Roman empire. Empiricist medical writing, however, is only fragmentarily preserved in the works of others, and only one substantial methodist treatise is extant. Instead, the largest group of texts surviving from this period locate themselves firmly in the rationalist tradition, but generically rather than specifically, and implicitly rather than explicitly.1 The distinct and divergent theoretical lineages—such as the Herophilean or Erasistratean schools—onto which rationalism was foisted by their rivals, seem to have dissolved into a much broader and looser familial grouping, still reluctant to embrace the label logikoi for themselves, though happy to apply it to their antecedents. Living lines of orthodoxy have been replaced by a common canon of ancient authorities. A shared theoretical framework has been assembled, or perhaps arrived at by process of accretion and assimilation, from all these sources, and some others. The internal aetiological singularity of the pathology of, for example, Herophilus or Erasistratus, has been superseded by a multifactorial analysis. Doctrinal irreconcilability has become difference of emphasis.

The question then arises whether the members of this group are, in fact, best labelled as logikoi, or as bearers of the newest sectarian title, that is as eklektikoi or episynthetikoi. Do these texts, in whole or in part, represent, or did they represent to their authors and audience, a new, homogenized rationalism, which had become not just a shared theory of knowledge, but

1 This pattern of transmission is partly shaped by the differential compatibility of these traditions with Galenism; and though different conditions in the Western empire and its successor states led to a distinctive pattern of transmission which favoured methodist texts more, it favoured them in later Latin versions, not the Greek original.

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 453

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.