Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

By Rebecca Flemming | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 2
Medicae and Iatrinai in Inscriptions

Included in this appendix are texts and translations of all the imperial inscriptions known to me which refer to medicae, iatrinai, or their orthographical variants. This is not, therefore, a collection of all inscriptions which link women with medical knowledge or skill, but only those which use these titles, in whatever way. The strict application of this criterion, and a closer reading of several of the texts concerned in their most recently published versions, means that the number of inscriptions included here is somewhat less than appear in most other epigraphic listings of female physicians (e.g. Ernst Künzl, ‘Ein archäologisches Problem: Gräber römischer Chirurginnen’, AMSSC I. 310–11), and, as will also become apparent, not all the inscriptional iatrinai themselves can be classified as female physicians either (though all the medicae can). I have, however, added the honorific inscription to Antiochis of Tlos to the end of this sequence, though the word iatrinē does not appear in it, since it is directly referred to in the book (p. 35 n. 3 above).

I have, furthermore, adopted a somewhat minimalist approach to this presentation overall. Descriptions are perfunctory, and largely taken, along with the datings, from existing publications, which are listed in summary form (if no date is given, that means the inscription is considered to be imperial, without further refinement). Nor are all doubtful readings and suggested restorations noted, and commentary is kept to a minimum. It is restricted to comments on the meaning of the texts themselves, rather than their wider significance. My aim is to provide texts and translations in an accessible form, together with the appropriate references for further research. For these references, the following abbreviations are used in addition to the customary ones:

GummerusHerman Gummerus, Der Ärztestand im römischen Reiche nach den Inschriften, 1 (Helsinki: Akademische Buchhandlung, 1932).
KorpelaJukka Korpela, Das Medizinpersonal im antiken Rom: Eine sozialgeschichtliche Untersuchung (Annales Academiae Scientiarum Fennicae, Dissertationes Humanarum Litterarum, 45; Helsinki: Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia, 1987).

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