Medicine and the Making of Roman Women: Gender, Nature, and Authority from Celsus to Galen

By Rebecca Flemming | Go to book overview

GENERAL INDEX
Classical names are listed as they appear in the text, beginning alphabetically from the beginning, not by gentilician or anything similar. Where there is a choice, preference is given to the English or Latin form of medical terms, titles, etc.
abortion 142, 162–3, 167–170, 239, 352, 368 see also foetus; miscarriage
Actium 26, 50
adultery 76, 169, 239, 368–9
Aelius Aristides (sophist) 49, 65, 68, 71–2, 74, 260
Aephicianus (physician) 260
Aeschrion the Empiric (physician) 260
Aetius of Amida (medical writer) 210, 218
Africa 143, 230
Agathinus the Spartan (physician) 87, 88, 190, 195
age 99, 114, 225
for beginning medical training 260–1
and disease 108, 159, 209, 210, 211, 341–2
effects on womb of 155–6, 233–4
and health 150, 273, 290, 292
for intercourse 236–7
and regimen 221–3
and therapeutics 177–8, 225, 247, 344, 350, 355
alchemy 8, 146
alipta, see iatraliptae ahpēkia 40
Alexander Philalethes (physician) 115, 193, 214, 231
Alexandria 50, 85
as centre of medical education 60–1, 146, 261, 269, 359
medical theories/models of 101, 120, 192, 207
see also Erasistratus; Herophilus
Anaxagoras (philosopher) 10
Anaximenes (philosopher) 9, 10
Andromachus the Younger (physician) 140, 355
Anna Faustina (relative of M. Aurelius) 270–1
Annas, Julia 18–9, 21, 22
Anonymus Londinensis (medical author) 193–4
physiology of 196, 201–2
Anonymus Parisinus (medical author) 104, 193–4, 226
pathology of 211, 213
therapeutics of 113
Antigonus (king) 145
Antonia (d. of Marc Antony) 143
Antoninus Pius (emperor) 45, 71
Antonius Musa (imperial physician) 51
Antiochis of Tlos (physician) 35 n. 3
Antiochus (king) 263, 264
Antyllus (physician) 195
On Healthful Declamation 225–6
therapeutics of 216, 219–220, 224–5, 226
aphonia 241, 338
apnoia 338
Apollonius Mys (physician) 214
Apollonius of Pergamum (physician) 195
apoplexia 241, 338, 346
apostēmata 216
Apuleius Celsus (physician) 141
Aquileia 266
Arabia 355
archai 100, 309–10, 348–9
of generation 118–19, 307
of the nerves 280
archiatń 45–6, 52, 55
Archigenes of Apamea (physician) 188, 190, 192, 210
sectarian identity of 88, 107, 195
Aretaeus the Cappadocian (physician) 98, 104, 194
female pathology of 209–12, 214

-443-

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