The Innovations of Idealism

By Rüdiger Bubner; Nicholas Walker | Go to book overview

FOREWORD TO THE ENGLISH EDITION

I am particularly gratified to see the completion of a long and difficult project with the appearance of this collection of essays. Even in our age of instant electronic communication, philosophical texts continue to present persistent problems for the ongoing task of hermeneutic appropriation. Despite all difficulties, Terence Moore at Cambridge University Press has always remained committed to the task of making these essays on the philosophy of German Idealism available in English translation. Robert Pippin, the editor of the Modern European Philosophy series, has also encouraged the project, and I am most grateful for his friendly assistance throughout. I would also like to express my appreciation to Terry Pinkard for his moral and intellectual support.

Above all, I am indebted to the translator, Nicholas Walker, who has undertaken the painstaking and challenging task of appropriate linguistic adaptation and transformation. I feel that the English translation has effectively succeeded in both capturing the thought and reflecting the style of the original essays. To reproduce a specific argument faithfully within the appropriate conceptual framework, and to present it without distortion in another language at once so close to and so remote from German, is no mean achievement.

These considerations are broadly practical in character. But I would also like to make a further point in this connection. The question of the relationship between so-called Continental philosophy and the socalled analytic tradition involves a range of fundamental problems of understanding that, despite the familiar contemporary rhetoric of communicative reason and the universally shared discourse of modern sciences and disciplines, are by no means easy to clarify. My hope was, and remains, carefully and cautiously to suggest something of the deeper potential unity behind the real diversity of approaches that characterise

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Innovations of Idealism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 274

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.