Innovation and Visualization: Trajectories, Strategies, and Myths

By Amy Ione | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
Introduction: Two Cultures?

What we conventionally call an “event” in history is simply a
segment of the endless web of experience that we have torn out of
context for purposes of clearer understanding.

H. Stuart Hughes, History as an Art and Science


1. Comparing Views of Historical and Contemporary Art

William M. Ivins, Jr., the Curator of Prints at the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1916-1930 notes in his book Prints and Visual Communication that “[i]t is amusing to think how few of the great weavers of aesthetic theory had any familiar first-hand acquaintance with works of art and how many of them either … knew the art they talked about only through engravings, or else sieved their ideas out of the empty air”1 (Ivins 1978: 174). Indeed earlier historians of art as well as writers on aesthetic theory often built their expertise upon a limited knowledge base personally and were aided in their studies by textual sources that were likely to rest on less exposure to the actual works than many of the globe-trotting public of today. Similarly, before the nineteenth century academic education about visual art was likely to rely on textual description more than actual engagement with the objects studied, although in some cases casts or a print depicting an original painting might be available to someone who could not travel. Ivins sums up the predicament well, writing:

Whenever we read a book, especially about art, archaeology, or
aesthetic theory, written prior to about the beginning of the first
world war, it is well to ask ourselves to what extent the writer had
both a dependable memory and a first-hand acquaintance with the
objects he referred to, to what extent he knew them through

1 This is accentuated when we consider that visual information circulated less historically than our sense of it in our visually saturated culture. Ivins estimates that the number of printed pictures produced between 1800 and 1901 was probably considerably greater than the total number of printed pictures that has been produced before 1801 (Ivins 1978).

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Innovation and Visualization: Trajectories, Strategies, and Myths
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 271

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.