Innovation and Visualization: Trajectories, Strategies, and Myths

By Amy Ione | Go to book overview

Chapter 5
Books, Rhetoric and Visual Art

First of all, he forged a shield that was huge and heavy,
elaborating it about and threw around it a shining triple rim that
glittered and the shield strap was cast of silver. There were five
folds making the shield itself and upon it he patterned out many
things, in his skill and his craftsmanship. He made the earth upon
it and the sky and the sea’s water and the tireless sun and the
moon waxing into her fullness and on it all the constellations that
garland the heavens, the Pleiades and the Hyades and the strength
of Orion and the Bear, whom men also call the Wagon, who turns
about in a fixed place and looks at Orion and she alone is never
plunged in the wash of the Ocean.

Homer, The Iliad XVIII, (The Shield of Achilles, lines 476-489)

One intriguing difference between Kandinsky’s urge to universalism and Klee’s intuitive and personal approach is that both of these painters spoke of subjectivity, a feature that began to take hold at the end of the eighteenth century, when the Romantic turn distinguished the scientific empiricism and philosophic logic from the “emotive feeling” attributed to the artist. Ironically, Zeki’s arguments, discussed in Chapter 3, resonate with this modus operandi, for he too equates art with the subjective. The discrete elements that highlight this quality are worthy of additional reflection, as is the degree to which the turn toward these ideas reflects the Western tradition as a whole. Approaching this topic returns the discussion to why I earlier took issue with Stafford’s view that the bedrock problem faced when endeavoring to integrate visual art into Consciousness Studies in not “What method do we write in?”


1. Ekphrasis

Homer’s depiction of the shield of Achilles is technically termed ekphrasis. Ekphrasis, the Greek term for description, refers to the verbal representation of visual representation. Homer’s representation is generally seen as the prototype and was followed by contributors to

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Innovation and Visualization: Trajectories, Strategies, and Myths
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 271

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.