Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 3

By Joel H. Wiener | Go to book overview

LOSS OF THE AMERICAN COLONIES

Proclamation by King George III Defining Forms of Government
in the Colonies and Restricting Westward Expansion,
7 October 1763*

Whereas We have taken into our Royal consideration the extensive and valuable acquisitions in America secured to our Crown by the late definitive treaty of peace, concluded at Paris the 10th day of February last; and being desirous that all our loving subjects, as well of our kingdoms as of our colonies in America, may avail themselves with all convenient speed of the great benefits and advantages which must accrue therefrom to their commerce, manufactures and navigation; we have thought fit, with the advice of our privy council, to issue this our-Royal Proclamation, hereby to publish and declare to all our loving subjects, that we have, with the advice of our said privy council, granted our letters patent under our great seal of Great Britain, to erect within the countries and islands ceded and confirmed to us by the said treaty, four distinct and separate governments, styled and called by the names of Quebec, East Florida, West Florida and Grenada, and limited and bounded as follows; viz.

Firstly, the government of Quebec, bounded on the Labrador coast by the river St. John, and from thence by a line drawn from the head of that river through the lake of St. John, to the south end of the lake Nipissim, from whence the said line crosses the river St. Lawrence and the lake Champlain, forty-five degrees of north latitude, passes along the high lands which divide the rivers that empty themselves into the said river St. Lawrence from those which fall into the sea, and also along the north coast of the Bay des Chaleurs, and the coast of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, to Cape Rosiers, and from thence crossing the mouth of the river St. Lawrence, by the west end of the island of Anticosti, terminates at the aforesaid river St. John.

Secondly, the government of East Florida, bounded to the westward by the Gulf of Mexico, and the Apalachicola river; to the northward, by a line drawn from that part of the said river where the Catahouchee and Flint rivers meet, to the source of St. Mary’s river, and by the course of the said river to the Atlantic Ocean; and to the east and south, by the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Florida, including all the islands within six leagues of the sea coast.

Thirdly, the government of West Florida, bounded to the southward by the Gulf of Mexico, including all islands within six leagues of the coast, from the river Apalachicola to lake Ponchartrain; to the westward, by the said lake, the

* Parliamentary Papers, 1828, VII, Cmd. 569, 344–46.

-2076-

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