Great Britain: Foreign Policy and the Span of Empire, 1689-1971: A Documentary History - Vol. 3

By Joel H. Wiener | Go to book overview

BRITISH POLICY IN AFRICA

Act to Revest the Administration of Gambia
in the “Company of Merchants Trading to Africa “
(23 Geo. Ill, c. 65), 17831

The Preamble states, That by the Preliminary Articles of Peace between His Majesty and the Most Christian King, signed at Versailles, Jan. 20, 1783, it was agreed, that the Fort of Senegal and its Dependencies should be ceded to His Most Christian Majesty, who on his Part guarantied to His Majesty the Possession of Fort James and the River Gambia; And as the said Fort and River are within the Limits between the Port of Sallee and Cape Rouge, on the Coast of Africa; and by an Act 5 Geo. Ill, Cap. 44, were vested in His Majesty, and were theretofore vested in the African Company by an Act 23 Geo. II for extending and improving the Trade to Africa: And as it will tend to the Improvement of the British Trade, if the said Fort and River were vested in the African Company, in like Manner as they were before the said Act of 5 Geo. Ill, it is enacted, That after the passing of this Act, the said Act of 5 Geo. Ill, Cap. 44, shall be repealed.

After the passing of this Act, Fort James and the River Gambia, and their Dependencies, and all other Forts, Settlements and Factories on the Coast of Africa, beginning at the Port of Sallee, and extending to Cape Rouge, and all other Territories, Ports and Places within the said Limits, excepting such as by the Ninth Article of the Preliminary Articles of Peace before mentioned are ceded to the Most Christian King; and all other the Property and Effects whatsoever, which, prior to making the said Act of 5 Geo. III. were possessed by the African Company within the said Limits, and which by the said Act were vested in His Majesty, are declared vested in the African Company, to be employed for the Protection of the African Trade, and to be under the same Regulations as the other Forts and Settlements upon the Coast of Africa; And the African Company may exercise all Powers granted to them by the Act 23 Geo. II. so far as the same concern any of the Territories lying within the aforesaid Limits, and vested in them by this Act.

The Trade to Africa shall continue free to all His Majesty’s Subjects; and it shall be lawful for all of them, without Distinction, to trade to any of the Ports vested in the said Company; and the Forts, Warehouses and Buildings vested in them shall continue free to all His Majesty’s Subjects, for the same Purposes, and Subject to the same Regulations, they heretofore were, under the Authority of the said Act of 23 Geo. II.

* Public General Statutes, 11, 227–28.

-2241-

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