Stone Tool Traditions in the Contact Era

By Charles R. Cobb | Go to book overview

11
Discussion

Douglas B. Bamforth

If there are still scholars who think that archaeological data do not add significantly to our understanding of the process of cultural change over the course of the Contact period in North America, the papers in this volume should change their minds. From documenting patterns of change that occurred beyond the reach of literate Europeans to focusing our attention on telling details of wellknown periods in recent post-Contact history that the documentary record overlooks, the authors here show clearly how archaeology can expand traditional reconstructions of post-Contact changes in Native-American ways of life.

Like any collection of technically and geographically diverse archaeological analyses, this one has implications for a wide range of issues. I focus here on two of these: first, on a technical issue that these papers share with lithic analysis in general and, second, on the ways in which the papers here illustrate the complexity of the factors that influence technological change.


ONE TECHNICAL ISSUE: LITHIC TAPHONOMY

The majority of the papers here focus on Contact-period flaked-stone technology, and they draw on and highlight the technical sophistication of that domain of research in archaeology in general. However, they also demonstrate the lack of attention to taphonomic process by that domain of archaeology. Most of these papers report on one component of larger research projects that must focus on many classes of material culture, and a volume on, for example, the faunal analyses that parallel the studies included here would have considered taphonomy in detail. I make this point not because there are well-understood taphonomic processes that fundamentally alter the arguments made here but because all aspects of the archaeological record in all times and places reflect both the processes of human behavior that archaeologists want to understand and a

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stone Tool Traditions in the Contact Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Tables ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Lithic Technology and the Spanish Entrada at the King Site in Northwest Georgia 13
  • 3 - Wichita Tools on First Contact with the French 29
  • 4 - Chickasaw Lithic Technology- a Reassessment 51
  • 5 - Tools of Contact 59
  • 6 - Lithic Artifacts in Seventeenth-Century Native New England 78
  • 7 - Stone Adze Economies in Post-Contact Hawai'i 94
  • 8 - In All the Solemnity of Profound Smoking 109
  • 9 - Using a Rock in a Hard Place 127
  • 10 - Flint and Foxes 151
  • 11 - Discussion 165
  • References Cited 173
  • Contributors 205
  • Index 209
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.