Investing in a Sustainable World: Why Green Is the New Color of Money on Wall Street

By Matthew J. Kiernan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book was written in a somewhat unconventional fashion, with direct implications for the Acknowledgments. No one reviewed draft chapters and gave helpful suggestions; in fairness, they were never asked to. Indeed, no one saw so much as a single paragraph until this book was completed. For better or worse, this approach gives new meaning to the classic bromide that “any errors or mistakes are the responsibility of the author.” That’s for sure! As a result, the usual acknowledgments to the kind souls who enriched the book by commenting on it cannot truthfully be made here. That is not, however, to imply that I am without intellectual debts; far from it. Individuals far too numerous to mention (some of them perhaps unknowingly) have contributed to my ongoing and sometimes painful education over the past 15 years—roughly the gestation period of this book.

Chief among them are my colleagues and friends at Innovest Strategic Value Advisors. First among equals are Hewson Baltzell, Andy White, and Pierre Trevet, as well as my former Innovest colleague Martin Whittaker. I also owe a huge debt to my talented research assistants: Priti Shokeen, Nick Brown, Simon Gargonne, and Darwin Fletcher. Their work on the dozens of case studies was literally indispensable.

I am also indebted to my literary agent Cynthia Zigmund, who engineered what was for me a match made in heaven with my publisher, AMACOM. At AMACOM, I am particularly grateful to American Management Association CEO Ed Reilly and AMACOM President Hank Kennedy for their vision, enthusiasm, and consistent support throughout the project. My editor, Bob Shuman, was unfailingly both accessible and helpful, and both I and the reader are the beneficiaries of his many contributions. Barbara Chernow and Andy Ambraziejus also made major contributions to both the quality and the timely emergence of the book; my thanks to both of them!

Finally, I will always be in the debt of my family: my wife Catherine Harris and our children—now young adults—Susannah and Patrick. All three are a constant inspiration. And, for Susannah, additional special thanks for the expert and patient shepherding of the manuscript.

-xx-

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