Pinoy Capital: The Filipino Nation in Daly City

By Benito M. Vergara Jr. | Go to book overview

4
SPREADING THE NEWS
Newspapers and Transnational Belonging

If the desire for transnationality is embedded in Filipino immigrant lives, it is perhaps most prominently displayed in the pages of a newspaper. The Philippine News, a Filipino weekly newspaper based in South San Francisco, California, is the most politically influential of all Filipino newspapers in the United States and also one of the oldest. It is the most widely circulated and the most prominent Filipino newspaper in America today. For that reason alone, the Philippine News illuminates the political and cultural dynamics of the Filipino immigrant community and offers a better understanding of the ways in which Filipino immigrant obligations intersect and oppose each other in public discourse.

The Philippine News, perhaps more than other Filipino American newspapers, claims to speak for the Filipino community. By the mid-’90s, it had earned this right, because of its long history of opposition to the Marcos regime. Such pronouncements are, of course, true for most newspapers in general: editorial opinions, however personal, are still gauged with the reading audience in mind, and one expects an overlapping of interests, if not beliefs, between the audience and the articles. A newspaper is, after all, a product that is sold; any sharp deviation from the interests of its audience—let us call it its reading community here, as each newspaper arguably has its own—would imperil its sales. It also has to be able to present itself to advertisers as able to deliver a particular community and audience. The power of the newspaper is in its ability to engage, even sporadically unite, its community of readers; in this strength lies a certain responsibility. The newspaper’s influence, if not its

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Pinoy Capital: The Filipino Nation in Daly City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1- A Repeated Turning 1
  • 2- Little Manila 23
  • 3- Looking Forward Narratives of Obligation 46
  • 4- Spreading the News Newspapers and Transnational Belonging 80
  • 5- Looking Back Indifference, Responsibility, and the Anti-Marcos Movement in the United States 109
  • 6- Betrayal and Belonging 134
  • 7- Citizenship and Nostalgia 161
  • 8- Pinoy Capital 192
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 215
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