Pinoy Capital: The Filipino Nation in Daly City

By Benito M. Vergara Jr. | Go to book overview

6
BETRAYAL AND BELONGING

MICHAEL SANTOS (MS): How about you, if you were given the
chance—you’ve already worked here, you’re already earning a big
salary, and then you’re offered [a job] there… maybe, I don’t
know, if there’s anything that loyalty or being nationalistic can
do. Anyway, all of us, we’re all thinking of—materialism is what
we—we’re materialistic.

BV: Is that what you think, that’s how we are, the Filipinos who are
here?

MS: Maybe. However much you love your country, you don’t want to
leave it, but you see that your life is not improving, then what are
you going to do there, right?

Many scholars have used the push-pull model of migration, but it has been criticized for its neo-functionalism and assumption of discrete, autonomous receiving and sending states (Rouse 1992). Rouse adds that “the emphasis on a bipolar framework has obscured the ways in which many settlers… have managed to maintain active involvements with the people and places they have left behind and… have often helped create new kinds of communities that span the international border” (1992, 25).1 His reconcep-

1Indeed, the bipolar framework (and the easy separability of “here” and “there”) has its echoes as well in the semi-racist conceptualizations of immigrant or ethnic identity as either/or, e.g., either Asian or American, and not both.

-134-

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Pinoy Capital: The Filipino Nation in Daly City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1- A Repeated Turning 1
  • 2- Little Manila 23
  • 3- Looking Forward Narratives of Obligation 46
  • 4- Spreading the News Newspapers and Transnational Belonging 80
  • 5- Looking Back Indifference, Responsibility, and the Anti-Marcos Movement in the United States 109
  • 6- Betrayal and Belonging 134
  • 7- Citizenship and Nostalgia 161
  • 8- Pinoy Capital 192
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 215
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