Pinoy Capital: The Filipino Nation in Daly City

By Benito M. Vergara Jr. | Go to book overview

8
PINOY CAPITAL

On a summer day in 1931, the writer Carlos Bulosan stood on the deck
of a ship after almost a month in steerage and saw America for the
first time. He felt he had come home.

We arrived in Seattle on a June day. My first sight of the approaching
land was an exhilarating experience. Everything seemed native and
promising to me. It was like coming home after a long voyage, al-
though as yet I had no home in this city. Everything seemed familiar
and kind.… With a sudden surge of joy, I knew that I must find a
home in this new land (Bulosan 1973, 99).

His reaction to the view, as described in his semi-fictional memoir America Is in the Heart, comes as a surprise. It almost seems drawn from the stereo typical arrival scene in immigrant novels (and later, films), dictated by the demands of the narrative and the genre, and dramatically enhanced by hindsight. Indeed, there is little foreshadowing in his account that he would set off for America, much less embrace it with such excitement. We are told, for instance, about the kindly American librarian who teaches him about Abraham Lincoln, but this is the extent of his fascination; mostly, we read about the discouraging letters his brother sends him from California, and this is all we know of the United States. Yet he arrives in Seattle already recognizing the “familiar” and the “native.”

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pinoy Capital: The Filipino Nation in Daly City
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • 1- A Repeated Turning 1
  • 2- Little Manila 23
  • 3- Looking Forward Narratives of Obligation 46
  • 4- Spreading the News Newspapers and Transnational Belonging 80
  • 5- Looking Back Indifference, Responsibility, and the Anti-Marcos Movement in the United States 109
  • 6- Betrayal and Belonging 134
  • 7- Citizenship and Nostalgia 161
  • 8- Pinoy Capital 192
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.