City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics

By Alex S. Vitale | Go to book overview

7
The Community Backlash

In chapter 6, I demonstrated how the failure of the NYPD to adequately address the disorder problem led to a public backlash against it that undermined its basic legitimacy. This process began before the election of Rudolph Giuliani as mayor and led to many of the changes in the basic policing strategies in New York City. A similar crisis of legitimacy took place in regard to urban liberal politicians. In 1993, the Dinkins administration was voted out of office, in large part because of its inability to reduce the level of homelessness and moderate its effect on the everyday lives of the rest of the population. Rudolph Giuliani, who replaced him, campaigned on a platform of replacing the urban liberal social services approach with a series of “tough love” measures designed to force homeless people either to enter rehabilitation programs and shelters or to face eviction from public spaces and ultimately incarceration. Whereas the police were accused of being insensitive to community concerns about disorder, urban liberal politicians were accused of responding to the disorder crisis without the full participation of the communities and of calling for social tolerance without creating the possibilities of acting on that tolerance. This chapter considers how these two contradictions led to community backlashes against urban liberalism, which in turn helped usher in the new conservative Giuliani administration and the quality-of-life paradigm.

As discussed in chapter 3, urban liberalism relied on rehabilitative social programs coordinated by centralized experts to address social problems. As the homelessness and disorder problems intensified in the 1980s, urban liberals attempted to respond to them by creating a series of emergency social services. This approach was driven by citywide concerns about the legal requirements to shelter the homeless and the desire to ameliorate the conditions of homeless people within the constraints of the city budget, as discussed in chapter 4. This approach never directly addressed the changes in the labor and housing markets that were

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Conceptualizing the Paradigm Shift 15
  • 2- Defining the Quality-of-Life Paradigm 29
  • 3- Defining Urban Liberalism 54
  • 4- The Rise of Disorder 70
  • 5- Globalization and the Urban Crisis 93
  • 6- The Transformation of Policing 115
  • 7- The Community Backlash 144
  • Conclusion 183
  • Notes 195
  • Bibliography 215
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 231

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.