Playing It Safe: How the Supreme Court Sidesteps Hard Cases and Stunts the Development of Law

By Lisa A. Kloppenberg | Go to book overview

About the Author

Lisa A. Kloppenberg is Dean and Professor of Law at the Uni- versity of Dayton School of Law. Previously, she was an Associate Profes- sor of Law and founding Director of the Appropriate Dispute Resolution (ADR) Program at the University of Oregon School of Law. She has taught Constitutional Law, Federal Courts, Civil Procedure, and ADR. She earned the Orlando J. Hollis Teaching Award at Oregon and has re- ceived national recognition for her scholarly work on the avoidance doc- trine. Her federal court interest is also reflected in her work on civil rules revision and as mediation pilot with the U.S. District Court for the Dis- trict of Oregon.

Dean Kloppenberg graduated from the University of Southern Cali- fornia Law Center in 1987, where she was Order of the Coif and Editor- in-Chief of the Southern California Law Review. After clerking for the Honorable Dorothy Wright Nelson, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, she gained experience in litigation, arbitration, and mediation of civil disputes at Kaye, Scholer, Fierman, Hays and Handler in Washing- ton, D.C. Her pro bono efforts have included mediation of disputes, as- sistance for torture survivors with immigration and political asylum mat- ters, and involvement with at-risk children and their families through the Relief Nursery. Dean Kloppenberg is married to Mark Robert Zunich and they have three children, Nicholas, Timothy, and Kellen.

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