Social Scientists for Social Justice: Making the Case against Segregation

By John P. Jackson Jr. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation, which supported this work through their Office of Law and Social Sciences.

I have been very gratified by the enthusiasm of Jean Stefancic and Richard Delgado. Their support has been invaluable for me in getting this project in its final form. Stephen Magro and everyone else at New York University Press have been very supportive, and I thank them.

Historians would be unable to practice their trade without archivists and librarians. I was very fortunate to have the help of many able archivists, including Sharon Ochencrist and John Popplestone at the Archive for the History of American Psychology in Akron, Ohio; Michelle Feller-Kopman at the American Jewish Historical Society in Waltham, Massachusetts; Mike Widener at the Tarleton Law Library in Austin, Texas; the staffs of the Harvard University Archives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the University of Chicago Archives in Chicago, Illinois, and the University of Minnesota archives in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Special thanks need to go to the staff of the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., who were exceedingly helpful during my extended visit.

A number of people offered advice, encouragement, and support during the course of this project. I thank Fran Cherry, Mary Dudziak, Ellen Herman, Ben Keppel, Paul Kimmel, and Ian Nicholson. Mark Tushnet bought me lunch and shared his vast knowledge of the NAACP-LDEF one pleasant afternoon in Washington. John Galliher graciously shared pages of his then-forthcoming book on Alfred McClung Lee.

Ben Harris introduced me to the professional world of the history of psychology and gave me opportunities to present my ideas publicly. Neil Jumonville first suggested to me that I should try to write this book.

I need to thank many, many friends who helped me in so many ways that I cannot possibly recount them all here. This work would have been

-xi-

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Social Scientists for Social Justice: Making the Case against Segregation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Part I - Background 15
  • 2 - The Study of Race between the Wars 17
  • 3 - The Effect of World War II on the Study of Racial Prejudice 43
  • Part II - Forging the Alliance 61
  • 4 - The American Jewish Congress 63
  • 5 - Pre-Brown Litigation 79
  • Part III - Brown Litigation 107
  • 6 - Recruiting Expert Witnesses 109
  • 7 - Testimony of the Experts 125
  • 8 - Supreme Court Hearings and Decision, Brown I 153
  • 9 - Supreme Court Hearings and Decision, Brown II 182
  • Part IV - Dissolution 197
  • 10 - Committee of Social Science Consultants 199
  • 11 - Conclusion 213
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 285
  • About the Author 291
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