Noir Urbanisms: Dystopic Images of the Modern City

By Gyan Prakash | Go to book overview

Contributors

David R. Ambaras is associate professor of history at North Carolina State University. His current research examines the experiences of down-and-out Japanese, discourses of marginality and social failure, and representations of “spaces of distress” in modern Japan and in East Asia under Japanese imperialism. He is the author of Bad Youth: Juvenile Delinquency and the Politics of Everyday Life in Modern Japan (2006).

James Donald is professor of film studies and dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He is author of Imagining the Modern City (1999), Sentimental Education: Schooling, Popular Culture and the Regulation of Liberty (1992), and the Penguin Atlas of Media and Information (2001); his edited books include Thresholds: Psychoanalysis and Cultural Theory (1991), “Race,” Culture and Difference (1992), and Close Up, 1927–1933: Cinema and Modernism (1998). His main research project at present is on the modernism of Josephine Baker and Paul Robeson, funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Grant.

Rubén Gallo is the author of Mexican Modernity: The Avant-Garde and the Technological Revolution (2005). His most recent book is Freud’s Mexico: Into the Wilds of Psychoanalysis (2010). He teaches at Princeton University, where he directs the Latin American Studies Program.

Anton Kaes is the Class of 1939 Professor of German and Film Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of several books in English and German that deal with multidisciplinary and comparative aspects of film history and theory, including the recent Shell Shock Cinema: Weimar Culture and the Wounds of War (2009). Major awards include Fellowships of the Rockefeller Foundation in 1978 and the Humboldt Foundation in 1984/85, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1990, and an NEH and UC President’s Research Fellowship in 1995. He was also a Scholar in Residence at the Getty Center for Art History and the Humanities in 1989–90 and at Bellagio in 1998. In 2007 he was the recipient of the Humboldt Research Prize.

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Noir Urbanisms: Dystopic Images of the Modern City
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 277

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.