Religion and Democracy in the United States: Danger or Opportunity?

By Alan Wolfe; Ira Katznelson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

OUR FIRST DEBT is owed to the American Political Science Association for initiating and supporting the Task Force on Religion and Democracy in the United States that produced this book. A discussion of the purposes, process, and composition of the Task Force can be found in chapter 1 of the volume.

None of our work would have been possible without the support of the wonderfully thoughtful and efficient staff of the APSA in Washington, DC, especially the tireless work of Robert Hauck, its Deputy Director and Liaison to the Task Force. He participated in our deliberations, handled the group’s daunting logistics (bringing us together four times over two years), and smoothed the process toward publication.

We also owe a special debt to the Russell Sage Foundation. We warmly thank its President, Eric Wanner, for the decision to join with APSA to underwrite the meetings of the Task Force meetings, and for his keen interest in the subject of our deliberations.

This volume is co-published by the Foundation, where Suzanne Nichols, its Director of Publications, has worked hand in hand with Chuck Myers and his colleagues at Princeton University Press, who deserve our thanks for their patience and for selecting outstanding reviewers whose comments improved all the chapters.

Mark Lilla and John DiIulio offered the benefit of their wisdom and helped us frame the questions we asked at the early stage of work. Susan Richard, at Boston College, played an indispensable role in the preparation of the manuscript.

-ix-

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