Religion and Democracy in the United States: Danger or Opportunity?

By Alan Wolfe; Ira Katznelson | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
ENTERING THE PROMISED LAND?
The Rise of Prosperity Gospel and
Post-Civil Rights Black Politics

FREDRICK C. HARRIS

THE FUNERAL of Martin Luther King Jr.’s widow, Coretta Scott King, in February 2006 symbolically revealed the diminishing influence of the prophetic tradition in African-American politics and civic life. What surfaced in this ritual of remembrance and homage to Mrs. King, who for over thirty years kept the memory and the values of her husband’s message of peace and social change in the nation’s consciousness, was a nod to a theological worldview whose beliefs are antithetical to the prophetic tradition Dr. King embraced. Dr. King’s funeral in 1968 had been held at the Ebenezer Baptist Church, which is surrounded by a poor neighborhood east of downtown Atlanta, but the final service for Mrs. King was held at New Birth Missionary Baptist Church—a suburban megachurch 15 miles outside of the city—whose minister, Bishop Eddie Long, is an ardent supporter of a theology that teaches the virtues of material prosperity.

Long had been criticized months before when a newspaper investigation revealed that he received compensation from the church’s charity organization that included a million dollar plus salary, a $1.4 million mansion, and a Bentley automobile. When asked by a reporter about the compensation, Bishop Long responded: “We’re not just a church, we’re an international corporation.” Informing the reporter that “Jesus wasn’t poor,” Bishop Long justified his compensation from the charity, pointing out that “we’re not just a bumbling bunch of preachers who can’t talk and all we’re doing is baptizing babies.… You’ve got to put me on a different scale than the little black preacher sitting over there that’s supposed to be just getting by because the people are suffering.”1

The controversy did not end there. When the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC), a predominately black Christian seminary in Atlanta, invited Bishop Long to speak at its commencement, students protested, an honorary degree recipient boycotted the ceremony, and a long-time trustee of the seminary expressed outrage. The honorary

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion and Democracy in the United States: Danger or Opportunity?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 444

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.