Gladstone and the Irish Nation

By J. L. Hammond | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXV
THE LIBERAL SPLIT
February 18. Gladstone's third Government meets Parliament.
March 26. Home Rule Bill brought before Cabinet. Chamberlain and Trevelyan resign.
April 8. Gladstone introduces Home Rule Bill.
April 16. Gladstone introduces Land Purchase Bill.
May 10. Gladstone moves second reading of Home Rule Bill.
May 27. Liberal Party meeting at Foreign Office on Home Rule Bill.
May 31. Chamberlain holds meeting of 55 members "who being in favour of some sort of autonomy for Ireland disapproved of the Government Bills in their present shape." Bright sends letter stating his intention of voting against the second reading. The meeting decides by a majority on voting against the second reading.
June 7. Home Rule Bill defeated on second reading by 343 votes to 313, 93 Liberals voting against the Bill.

The voting of the non-Irish Members was as follows:

ForAgainstAbsent
L.C.L.C.L.C.
England and Wales. . .19107022391
Scotland. . .. . .380231010
229093233101
July. Dissolution of Parliament and General Election. Conservatives 316, Liberal Unionists 78, Home Rule Liberals 194, Irish Home Rulers 85.

The Cabinet with which Gladstone set out on his great task contained fourteen members. The leading Whigs had followed Hartington, and Selborne, Northbrook, Carling

-472-

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