British Romantic Drama: Historical and Critical Essays

By Terence Allan Hoagwood; Daniel P. Watkins | Go to book overview

Contributors

JEFFREY N. Cox is Professor of English at Texas A&M University, where he also serves as Director of the Interdisciplinary Group for Histori- cal Study. He is the author of In the Shadows of Romance: Roman- tic Tragic Drama in Germany, England, and France (1987), the editor of Seven Gothic Dramas 1789–1825 (1992), and the coeditor with Larry Reynolds of New Historical Literary Study: Reproducing Texts, Representing History. His book, The Cockney School: Poetics and Politics in the Hunt Circle, is forthcoming from Cambridge UP.

SUZANNE FERRISS is Associate Professor of Liberal Arts at Nova South- eastern University. Coeditor of On Fashion (1994), she has pub- lished articles on Romantic poetry and drama, feminist theory, and film. She is currently working with Shari Benstock on A Hand- book of Literary Feminism and a companion anthology.

TERENCE ALLAN HOAGWOOD, Professor of English at Texas A&M Univer- sity and Fellow of the Interdisciplinary Group for Historical Study, is the author of Politics, Philosophy, and the Production of Roman- tic Texts (1996), Byron’s Dialectic: Skepticism and the Critique of Culture (1993), Skepticism and Ideology (1988), Prophecy and the Philosophy of Mind: Traditions of Blake and Shelley (1985), and other books. He is the editor of several previously rare works of eighteenth-century and nineteenth-century literature, including Violet Fane’s Denzil Place (1996), Mary Robinson’s Sappho and Phaon (1995), Robert Stephen Hawker’s Cornish Ballads (1994), Charlotte Smith’s “Beachy Head” and Other Poems (1993), Eliza- beth Smith’s The Brethren: A Poem in Four Books (1991), and Mary Hays’s The Victim of Prejudice (1990). He is also the editor of a collection of essays by several hands entitled Materialism and Textuality, which appeared as the Spring 1997 issue of Studies in the Literary Imagination.

KENNETH R. JOHNSTON, Professor and Chair, Department of English, Indiana University, Bloomington, is the author of Wordsworth and “The Recluse” (1984) and Young Wordsworth: Creation of the Poet

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