Philo in Early Christian Literature: A Survey

By David T. Runia | Go to book overview

Chapter Nine
Origen

1. From Alexandria to Palestine1

Origen (185–253) represents the following generation of the Alexandrian school. Eusebius describes him as Clement’s pupil.2 This may be a speculative deduction from a passage in a letter of Alexander, bishop of Jerusalem, for no there is no direct evidence to support it (and Origen was only 17 when Clement left Alexandria for good in 202).3 It is abundantly clear, however, that Origen is the spiritual heir of Pantaenus and Clement. Indeed his theology and exegetical activity could have had no other place of origin. Unlike Clement, Origen was born into a Christian home. But he too spent a considerable time obtaining a training in Greek literature and philosophy (he probably had the same teacher as Plotinus), and even ran his own school as a grammatikos for a time. Origen became more and more attracted, however, to the study and exposition of scripture, and at a decisive moment he decided to sell his books of secular literature. Origen is the last of the great teachers of Alexandria to operate in relative independence of the Church hierarchy. Like his distinguished predecessors he belongs to the segment of the Alexandrian Church with strong intellectual interests. In time he becomes their leader and spokesman. Just at the same time, however, his bishop, Demetrius, was busy converting the relatively open organization of the church of Alexandria into a tightly structured hierarchy. Origen’s independence and intellectualism were a thorn in the bishop’s flesh. Demetrius criticized various views that Origen developed on doctrinal questions, and refused to make him a priest. In the end the tensions in the relationship between bishop and scholar became too much.

1 A shortened version of this chapter was presented at the 5th International Origen conference held at Boston in August 1990 and published in its proceedings, Runia (1992f).

2HE 6.6.1.

3 As suggested by Nautin (1977), with reference to 6.11.6. In what follows I largely follow the magisterial reconstruction of Origen’s life and chronology offered in this study. Based on a minute examination of the evidence in Origen’s writings and other sources, it contains speculative elements, but the overall portrait is persuasive. Among more recent synoptic studies it is followed by Trigg (1983), cf. 264, but criticized by Crouzel (1985), cf. esp. the long note on p. 18.

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Philo in Early Christian Literature: A Survey
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 418

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.