Tending the Garden State: Preserving New Jersey's Farming Legacy

By Charles H. Harrison | Go to book overview

Epilogue

When I was writing the book Salem County: A Story of People, it occurred to me for the first time, I regret to admit, that when the Quakers and the Dutch handed over to the Leni-Lenape a trifling amount of trinkets, the Native Americans were, of course, grateful and were more than willing to share the land, but they didn’t figure out until much later—too late, of course—that the tokens they had accepted from the white men had purchased the land they never owned in the first place. All those thousands of acres now belonged to the newcomers, and the Leni-Lenape could continue to use and enjoy the land only insofar as the white settlers allowed.

Years later, while composing this book, from time to time I reflected on those distant transactions and how the Leni-Lenape must have been dumbfounded and not a little angry to learn that those squiggly lines on paper translated “bought and sold,” “paid in full.” Also occasionally, I imagined little groups of Leni-Lenape women descended from ancient Asian sojourners scratching in gardens where now families with shallow roots in the Garden State live in mammoth, mortgaged mansions.

Fortunately, I also have envisioned Leni-Lenape ghosts hovering above the land they never owned but only tended and offering their guarded approval of how men and women of many races, nationalities, and cultures are today caring for what remains of their and the Europeans’ “pleasant and profitable country.” Most certainly the

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tending the Garden State: Preserving New Jersey's Farming Legacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Prologue vii
  • Chapter 1 - "A Pleasant and Profitable Country" 1
  • Chapter 2 - "The Biggest Vegetable Factory on Earth" 21
  • Chapter 3 - "A Decent Home for Every American Family" 48
  • Chapter 4 - "Keep Farmers Farming" 73
  • Chapter 5 - "We Sure Hope It Works" 96
  • Chapter 6 - "Always a Call to the Land" 115
  • Chapter 7 - "Either Change and Keep Up or Get out of the Way" 139
  • Epilogue 160
  • Notes 163
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 173
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 174

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.