Tending the Garden State: Preserving New Jersey's Farming Legacy

By Charles H. Harrison | Go to book overview

INDEX
agribusiness: and direct marketing, 140; less reliance on labor, 60; management skills, 60–61; more regulation of, 60–61; and specialization, 63; and use of chemicals, 61
Agricultural Experiment Stations: creation of, 34–35; early years, 137; Food Innovation Center, 140–142; Haskin Shellfish Research Laboratory (see aquaculture); Phillip E. Marucci Center for Blueberry and Cranberry Research, 120–121, 123; Plant Science Research and Extension Farm, and turfgrasses, 124–127; Research and Extension Center, and asparagus research, 129–130, Rutgers Eco-Complex, 146–147. See also Rutgers, The State University
agriculture: in eighteenth century, 8; and Industrial Revolution, 17–19; in seventeenth century, 7–8. See also New Jersey, state of
American Revolution, 9–10, 11–13
Anderson, Karen, on organic farming, 132–133
aquaculture: aquatic farmer’s licenses, 150; as contribution to state’s economy, 149–150; koi farming, 150–151; oyster industry, 152–153; shrimp farming, 152
asparagus: as cash crop, 129; seed sold worldwide, 129–130
assessment, farmland, 75, 92–96
Atlantic Blueberry Company: exports, 119–120; founding, 119; as major producer of fresh blueberries, 119
Bergen County: during American Revolution, 9–10; and post–World War II housing boom, 52, 57–58
biodiesel fuel: opinion of Maryland Soybean Board about, 148; produced by Woodruff Energy, 148; uses of, 148–149
blueberries: and acid soil, 117; early experimental plantings, 117–118; as major industry, 115; research role of Elizabeth White, 118. See also Agricultural Experiment Stations: Phillip E. Marucci Center for Blueberry and Cranberry Research; Atlantic Blueberry Company
Brown, Art, views on farmland assessment, 75

-169-

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Tending the Garden State: Preserving New Jersey's Farming Legacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Prologue vii
  • Chapter 1 - "A Pleasant and Profitable Country" 1
  • Chapter 2 - "The Biggest Vegetable Factory on Earth" 21
  • Chapter 3 - "A Decent Home for Every American Family" 48
  • Chapter 4 - "Keep Farmers Farming" 73
  • Chapter 5 - "We Sure Hope It Works" 96
  • Chapter 6 - "Always a Call to the Land" 115
  • Chapter 7 - "Either Change and Keep Up or Get out of the Way" 139
  • Epilogue 160
  • Notes 163
  • Index 169
  • About the Author 173
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