A Twentieth-Century Prophet: Oscaar Jaaszi, 1875-1957

By György Litván | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Huszadik Század

Reminiscing about the mentors of his youth, the elderly Jászi recalls the conversations he used to have with Ermine Vámbéry. On hearing about the plans being made by young people and the movement they were going to start to campaign for universal suffrage, the renowned orientalist remarked: “Young fellow, this will come to no good. Proclaiming Western social policies in Hungary is like trying to open a pork butcher’s shop in Mecca.” The writers associated with Huszadik Század had chosen to take on precisely this hard and even hopeless task, and no one within this circle was as alive to the political and ideological consequences of that enterprise as Jászi. Yet even he was not, nor indeed—at the start of a new century brimful of hope— could be he, fully alive to those consequences. It took the experience of 1905–6 and the genius of the poet Endre Ady for them all to really understand: “Our clash is with the Hungarian Hell.”

If all the signs are that Gusztáv Gratz and Bódog Somló took the lead in organizing, raising money and drumming-up collaborators in the periodical’s set-up phase, it was already apparent by the first issue, in early January 1900, that Jászi was its intellectual powerhouse. In the hands of and through the division of labor among his fellow editors, the periodical continued fairly cautiously to meet the demands of being a scientific and political ‘review’ in the issues and volumes that were to follow, for the time being without a break with university and academic scholarship; still, it was he who, with the occasional tough, combative article, declared war on scientific narrow-mindedness and political ‘reactionism.’

-19-

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A Twentieth-Century Prophet: Oscaar Jaaszi, 1875-1957
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vi
  • Chapter 1- Early Career 1
  • Chapter 2- Huszádik Század 19
  • Chapter 3- Radicalism 35
  • Chapter 4- Rifts and Alliances 57
  • Chapter 5- Marriage and War 83
  • Chapter 6- before the Revolution 113
  • Chapter 7- in the Revolution 137
  • Chapter 8- The Commune and Exile 179
  • Chapter 9- The Hungarian Newspaper of Vienna 209
  • Chapter 10- Danubian Cultural Alliance 233
  • Chapter 11- First Time in America 257
  • Chapter 12- Back in Vienna 287
  • Chapter 13- Betwixt Europe and America 305
  • Chapter 14- Dissolution 331
  • Chapter 15- Disputes between Generations 357
  • Chapter 16- American Citizen with a European Heart 369
  • Chapter 17- War Germs 397
  • Chapter 18- The Second World War 423
  • Chapter 19- Danubia—Old and New 457
  • Chapter 20- The Exile Cannot Return 497
  • Selected Bibliography 537
  • Index 539
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