Playing in Isolation: A History of Baseball in Taiwan

By Junwei Yu | Go to book overview

NOTES

All translations from Chinese to English are the author’s.


Introduction

1. During the Japanese colonial era the rulers enforced their own official language policy on Taiwan, and 71 percent of the population was able to speak Japanese fluently. After the KMT took over, it implemented the same policy but changed the language from Japanese to Mandarin Chinese. In 1956 the government mandated that students must speak only Mandarin or risk punishment. The policy was highly successful, and soon 90 percent of the islanders could speak Mandarin fluently. Indeed, many present-day Taiwanese have forgotten their native language.

2. Hughes, Taiwan and Chinese Nationalism, 131.

3. Each mainlander on Taiwan had been able to preserve ethnic identity by dividing that identity into two categories, mainlander and Taiwanese. This division was accomplished through the use on identity cards of provincial registration rather than birthplace. Consequently, a bizarre situation occurred in which a Taiwanese’s provincial registration could be, for example, Shanghai even though that person had been born in Taiwan and had never been to Shanghai just because the father came from that mainland province.


1. Wooden-Ball Finds a Home

1. Cai, “Riju shidai taiwan bangqiu,” 88.

2. Douglas C. Smith, “Foundations of Modern Chinese Education and the Taiwan Experience,” in Smith, ed., The Confucian Continuum, 7.

3. Latourette, The Chinese, 465. See also Miyazaki, China’s Examination Hell.

4. Zhao, Changzhong tiyu yundong de huiyi, 351.

5. Yin, Taiwan jindai shilun, 45–46.

6. For further details see Chen, “Houteng xinping zaitai zhimin zhengce zhi yanjiu.”

7. Zhang, “Taiwan bangqiu yu rentong,” 32. Gao argues that there is another explanation for Sakuma’s promotion of the sport: this act was his humble way of repaying the local Taiwanese deity Mazu, who in 1906 had appeared to his ailing wife in a dream and miraculously cured her. Gao, Dongsheng de xuri, 40–42.

-183-

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