Between Justice and Politics: The Ligue Des Droits de L'homme, 1898-1945

By William D. Irvine | Go to book overview

Introduction

The Ligue des droits de l’homme (League of the Rights of Man) was founded in Paris in June 1898. It took its title from the French Revolution’s Declaration of the Rights of Man of August 1789. What prompted its foundation was the growing concern about the unjust and illegal conviction for treason of Captain Alfred Dreyfus. But the League long outlived the Dreyfus affair and became, in its first forty years, the largest and most influential civil liberties organization in the world. The closest North American equivalent was the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), founded in 1920 and modeled in part after the League. But the League was different from the ACLU in several ways. It was a much larger organization. The League had 8,000 members within two years of its foundation, 80,000 within ten years. At its peak in 1933, it had 180,000 members organized in nearly 2,500 sections. By comparison, thirty years after its foundation the ACLU had barely 9,000 members, 45,000 in 1960, and at its largest in the early 1970s, hardly more than the League, in a nation with a population one-seventh that of the United States, had enjoyed in the early 1930s.1 Moreover, in the first half of the twentieth century, the League carried far more political clout than the ACLU ever would. In the 1988 presidential contest, George Bush Sr. would make much of the fact that his Democratic opponent, Michael Dukakis was “a card carrying member of the ACLU” and therefore on the extreme left of his party. French conservatives were no more charitably disposed to the League but rarely made an issue out of the League membership of their opponents because it would have been difficult to find, at least by the interwar years, a prominent left-wing politician who did not belong (or had not belonged) to the League.

Despite its prominent role in French political life in the first half of the twentieth century, the last history of the League, very much an insider account, dates from 1927.2 Until recently, an important reason for the relative historical neglect of the League has been a paucity of archival sources. Although the various house

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Between Justice and Politics: The Ligue Des Droits de L'homme, 1898-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Between Justice and Politics - The Ligue Des Droits de L'homme, 1898–1945 iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • One - Origins, Organization, and Structure 5
  • Two - Ici on Ne Fait Pas de la Politique 20
  • Three - Politics, Yes, but Not Electoral Politics 53
  • Four - Liberty with All Its Risks 81
  • Five - The League from below 111
  • Six - War and Peace- 1914–1934 132
  • Seven - From the Popular Front to the Fall of France 160
  • Eight - Vichy 194
  • Epilogue 213
  • Notes 225
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.