Between Justice and Politics: The Ligue Des Droits de L'homme, 1898-1945

By William D. Irvine | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. ACLU membership figures must be used with caution as the ACLU distinguishes between “members” and “memberships” and inflates the former on the grounds that the partners of card-carrying members often share their commitment to the organization.

2. Henri Sée, Histoire de la ligue des droits de l’homme, 1893–1926 (Paris, 1927).

3. Wendy Ellen Perry, “Remembering Dreyfus: The Ligue des Droits de l’Homme and the Making of the Modern French Human Rights Movement” (Ph.D. diss., University of North Carolina, 1998), 326.

4. Françoise Basch, Victor Basch: De l’affaire Dreyfus au crime de la Milice (Paris, 1994).

5. See most notably the fine collection of articles in the special edition of Le Mouvement Social (no. 183, April–June, 1998) devoted to the League.

6. See in particular, Sylvie Claveau, “L’Autre dans les Cahiers des Droits de l’Homme, 1920–1940. Une sélection universaliste de l’altérité à La Ligue des Droits de l’homme et du Citoyen en France” (Ph.D. thesis, McGill University, 2000).

7. Madeleine Rebérioux, “Politique et société dans l’histoire de la Ligue des droits de l’homme,” Le Mouvement Social (no. 183, April–June 1998), 16.

8. Ibid., 22.

9. Ibid., 6.


CHAPTER 1

1. The best source for the early years of the League is Henri Sée, Histoire; additional useful information (including some corrections) can be found in the account of Emile Kahn, then secretary general, in La Lumière, June 10, 17, 24; July 1, 1938. Important also is Perry, “Remembering Dreyfus,” chapter 1.

2. The name originally proposed had been the Ligue pour la defence des droits des citoyens. Sée, Histoire, 10.

3. On the early activity of the League, see Mathias Morhardt, L’Oeuvre de la ligue des droits de l’homme, 1898–1910 (Paris, 1911), 98–101.

4. To be discussed in some detail in the next chapter.

5. In the early 1930s, the Radical party had somewhere between 70,000 and 100,000 members, the SFIO closer to 50,000, and the Communist Party more like 20,000. All such figures, unlike those of the League, are suspect and likely to be on the high side. Because membership in the traditional parties of the Right was always both small and notional, it is just possible that in 1933 the League had more members than all French political parties combined.

-225-

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Between Justice and Politics: The Ligue Des Droits de L'homme, 1898-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Between Justice and Politics - The Ligue Des Droits de L'homme, 1898–1945 iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • One - Origins, Organization, and Structure 5
  • Two - Ici on Ne Fait Pas de la Politique 20
  • Three - Politics, Yes, but Not Electoral Politics 53
  • Four - Liberty with All Its Risks 81
  • Five - The League from below 111
  • Six - War and Peace- 1914–1934 132
  • Seven - From the Popular Front to the Fall of France 160
  • Eight - Vichy 194
  • Epilogue 213
  • Notes 225
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 257
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