Research Methods for Law

By Mike McConville; Wing Hong Chui | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Dr Satnam Choongh has been called to the bar since 1994, and has extensive experience in empirical research in the area of criminal justice with special emphasis upon policing and race as well as wide experience as a barrister at law. He has taught at the University of Warwick and is Adjunct Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is author of Policing as Social Discipline (1997); Review of the Delay in the Criminal Justice System (1997); Improving Custodial Legal Advice (with L. Bridges, 1998) and Ethnic Minority Defendants and the Right to Elect Jury Trial (2000).

Dr Wing Hong Chui is Associate Professor, School of Law, The Chinese University of Hong Kong and formerly Senior Lecturer in the School of Social Science at the University of Queensland. He has published widely in crimi- nology, particularly in the area of juvenile justice and probation studies. He is currently undertaking empirical research into criminal procedure in the People’s Republic of China (with Professor Mike McConville) and litigants in person in civil proceedings in Hong Kong (with Professors Elsa Kelly and Camille Cameron). He is the co-editor of three books: Moving Probation Forward (with M. Nellis, 2003), Social Work and Human Services Best Practice (with J. Wilson, 2006), and Experiences of Transnational Chinese Migrants in the Asia-Pacific (with D. Ip and R. Hibbins, 2006). He is a member of the editor- ial boards of the International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology and Social and Public Policy Review, and is currently Book Review Editor of the Asian Journal of Criminology.

Ian Dobinson is Senior Lecturer, Law Faculty, University of Technology, Sydney, and previously Associate Professor, Law School, City University of Hong Kong. He has extensive teaching and research experience in the areas of criminal law, criminal justice and criminology and expertise in both quantitative and qualitative legal research methodologies. Past examples include a national survey of Australian judges and magistrates and their attitudes to sentencing

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