The Banana: Empires, Trade Wars, and Globalization

By James Wiley | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1. The terms third country and dollar zone are drawn directly from EU documents.


1. The Creation of the Banana Empire

1. Many of the Jamaicans remained in Costa Rica, and their descendants continue to live in the Puerto Limón area. They were finally granted citizenship during the 1950s.

2. Ellis (1983, 44) describes a 1906 United Fruit Company purchase of 50 percent of the shares in the Vaccaro Brothers Company, one of its principal potential rivals in Honduras. The U.S. court system thwarted this acquisition as a violation of antimonopoly legislation, so the company sold its shares in 1908. Ironically, the Vaccaro Brothers Company was reorganized in 1924 as the Standard Fruit Company, subsequently known as the Standard Fruit and Steamship Company, and became the chief competitor to the United in Central America.


2. The Empire Challenged

1. “Nine-hand bunch” refers to the output of one plant, measured vertically before being cut into the smaller bunches familiar to consumers. A nine-hand bunch was the industry’s standard measurement.

2. By the 1980s the Urubá zone was manifesting the same characteristics of decline, and the TNCS operating in the region began to move once again, this time returning to the Santa Marta area. This second shift threatened the livelihood of at least twenty thousand workers directly or indirectly employed in the industry in Urubá, the forty thousand people dependent upon them, and the six thousand homes provided by the companies for those families (Sierra 1986, 11–16).

-249-

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