Obelisk: A History of Jack Kahane and the Obelisk Press

By Neil Pearson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the following institutions for making me so welcome when I visited, and for offering such valuable assistance to me in the writing of this book: Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas; Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University; Berg Collection, New York Public Library; Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University; Bibliothèque Nationale de France; National Library of Scotland; Bodleian Library, Oxford University; Cambridge University Library; Special Collections, Leeds University Library; British Newspaper Library, Colindale; National Portrait Gallery archives, London; British Publisher Archives, Reading University; Reading Room, Victoria and Albert Museum; Special Collections, Sussex University Library; and the British Library, the best place to think in London, and my office while this book was being written.

Staff at the following institutions gave me invaluable long-distance help, responding to my enquiries with unfailing courtesy and efficiency: Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University; Widener Library, Harvard University; University of North Carolina Library; Princeton University Library; James Ford Bell Library, University of Minnesota; Southern Illinois University Library; University of Iowa Library; and the Dartmouth College Library, New Hampshire.

My agent Jamie Crawford, and Anthony Cond and Helen Tookey at Liverpool University Press, have gone out of their way to offer me help and support. Brian Bugler and Sylvia Brownrigg both found time to talk to me about their respective grandparents, Eric Benfield and Gawen Brownrigg; Patrick Wright talked to me about Benfield’s career as a sculptor; Caroline Theakstone at Getty Images found me pictures of some of the more obscure Obelisk writers; Aine Gibbons, librarian at Queen’s University, Belfast, located a thesis for me that had defeated the British Library; Chris Casson let me consult

-xi-

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