When Writing Met Art: From Symbol to Story

By Denise Schmandt-Besserat | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

WHEN WRITING MET ART is the outcome of a Weeks Fellowship at the Stanford Humanities Center during the 2003–2004 academic year. I wholeheartedly thank Rev. Marta S. Weeks for the privilege of spending a studious sabbatical year benefiting from the scholarly atmosphere and remarkable resources of Stanford University. I am most grateful to John Bender, director of the Humanities Center, and Elizabeth S. Wahl, associate director, who both helped me make the most of my fellowship in many ways.

At the University of Texas, I want to give special thanks to Sheldon Ekland-Olson, provost, and Stephen A. Monti, executive vice-provost, for their continuous support over the years.

Among the many friends and colleagues who showed interest in my work and gave me encouragement, I first express my gratitude to Barbara Lekisch. I am indebted to Wolfgang Heimpel, who helped with the translations of Sumerian inscriptions. I am deeply grateful to William W. Hallo and E. J. W.Barber, for the care they gave in reviewing the manuscript and for their most valuable advice.

It is not possible to express adequate appreciation to Joan Rubin, who has read and edited the various drafts of this manuscript and who year after year has helped me tirelessly with library research. I am deeply grateful for her time, interest, and friendship. The same is true for Ines Rivera-Silva, who has been a faithful and invaluable resource for precious references. I also thank Lela Urquart for her weekly delivery of library books while I was at Stanford. Finally, I thank Leah Leehorn for her help with Chapter 2.

At the University of Texas Press, I thank Joanna Hitchcock, director; Jim Burr, sponsoring editor; and Carolyn Cates Wylie and Mary LaMotte, editors, for their cordial professionalism.

-ix-

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When Writing Met Art: From Symbol to Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction- Writing and Art 1
  • I - How Writing Shaped Art 13
  • One - Pottery Painting 15
  • Two - Glyptic 27
  • Three - The Uruk Vase- Sequential Narrative 41
  • Four - Wall and Floor Painting 47
  • II - How Art Shaped Writing 61
  • Five - Funerary Inscriptions 63
  • Six - Votive and Dedicatory Inscriptions 71
  • Seven - The Stele of Hammurabi 87
  • Conclusion- The Interface between Writing and Art 101
  • Notes 107
  • Bibliography 117
  • Index 129
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