First Freedom First: A Citizen's Guide to Protecting Religious Liberty and the Separation of Church and State

By C. Welton Gaddy; Barry W. Lynn | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The publication of this book, like participation in the entire First Freedom First campaign, has been a venture in expansive cooperation.

Seldom does it happen, but in bringing together this publication, every single person to whom I turned for help said “yes” immediately. First among those was Barry Lynn, who consented on the spot to work with me on the content of the book. No sooner had I proposed the idea of the book to Helene Atwan, director of Beacon Press, than she said, “We are the ones to do this book, and we want to do it.”Tom Hallock encouraged the process and offered an amazing degree of flexibility in dealing with a traditionally inflexible publication schedule. Our editor, Brian Halley, has been a model of patience as well as a tremendous source of helpful counsel and other forms of support, personally and professionally.

Board members and staff members of the Grove Foundation have expressed an unusually high degree of interest in and made multiple suggestions regarding this whole campaign generally and this publication specifically. Special thanks go to Eva Grove, Karen Grove, and Rebekah Saul Butler. Andy Grove has been tenacious in his devotion to the First Freedom First campaign and gracious in his willingness to contribute a moving personal perspective on religious freedom to this volume.

I am grateful for the level of interest in and dedication to this project demonstrated by members of the staff of The Interfaith Alliance Foundation. Barry, I know, extends special thanks to writer/ researcher Adele Stan and to Americans United’s Rob Boston and Lauren Smith for lending enormous time and talent researching

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
First Freedom First: A Citizen's Guide to Protecting Religious Liberty and the Separation of Church and State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.