Acing the Interview: How to Ask and Answer the Questions That Will Get You the Job

By Tony Beshara | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
How and with Whom to Get
an Interview
Nothing is more important in the interviewing process than face-to-face interviews. All of the preparation, pristine resumes, excellent interviewing skills, a great track record, etc. don’t matter unless you can actually get in front of somebody who has “pain.” i.e., the need to hire someone. This is where the rubber meets the road.The kind of in-depth questions and answers you are going to learn in this book won’t mean anything unless you can get interviews. Inertia and lack of activity are the two biggest mistakes that most people make when they go look for a job. Fear causes inertia, and not knowing what to do causes lack of activity. An initial interview with just about anybody that really has a need to hire someone, if you are successful, will lead to second, third, and fourth interviews.Getting a job is a numbers game. Numbers of interviews are crucial to your getting good offers. In the coming market you may very well be able to get multiple offers. If you do your job right, and sell yourself well in enough quality interviews, getting great job offers will not be hard.You want to sit down and brainstorm all, and I mean all, of the people that you can think of who might be looking for a good employee. Here are some of the people you need to think about calling:
Previous employers, peers, and subordinates. These are people that you’ve worked for before moving on to other companies. You may

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