Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You'll Love to Do

By Shoya Zichy; Ann Bidou | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
Don’t Read
the Whole Book…

THIS IS NOT YOUR TYPICAL career book. The Color Q system doesn’t change people, but it does change how they view themselves. You will not be told to be more organized, to assert yourself, imitate your boss, or emulate some celebrity CEO. You will not even have to change how you dress. Instead, every word will move you to operate from your deepest, most natural talents, fueling the passion that separates good workers from great achievers. You just need to recognize your strengths and use them on a daily basis.

Sound easy? It’s not. Most of us come loaded down with guilt and parental/societal expectations that push us in unnatural directions. Did pressures like money, prestige, educational opportunity, or family desires force you into making more “practical” choices? If doing so hasn’t made you happy, then what will?

You need to get back to your core and make it work in the workplace. Define this core by taking the Color Q Self-Assessment in Chapter 2 and being bluntly honest. For many of you, it will be career-altering, IF you answer as you really are. Please note that a preference is NOT “I generally work with piles, but I’d prefer if I kept my desk clean.” What you actually do is what you prefer.

You do not need to read the whole book, unless you want to explore all sixteen Color Q personality types. Learning a little about other people’s styles, however, will help you in:

-2-

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