Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You'll Love to Do

By Shoya Zichy; Ann Bidou | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Greens Overall

GREENS REPRESENT APPROXIMATELY 17 percent of the overall world population. If you’re not a Green but would like to learn how to identify and communicate with one, go to Figure 5–1 on page 25.


News Personality Diane Sawyer

ABC News television journalist Diane Sawyer is one the best-known Greens in the United States. She epitomizes many of the group’s artistic and interpersonal skills. For most of her early adolescence, she recalls being nonconformist, klutzy, and “tediously serious.” She and her friends would go off to a creek to read Emerson and Thoreau. They called themselves the “reincarnated transcendentalists.” “My sister was the elegant one,” she recalls laughingly. “I was the one who kept falling down the stairs.”

But others remember that in high school she won the U.S. Junior Miss pageant and after college moved to Washington, DC to serve as assistant to Nixon White House press secretary Ron Ziegler.

In 1978 she took a job with CBS, but Dan Rather and other senior figures were very vocal about the presence of someone tainted by Watergate. She ultimately won over her colleagues with her incredible stamina, spending a week at the State Department during the Iranian hostage crisis, sleeping no more than an hour a day. They also were disarmed by her typical Green charm and ability to let her ego go for the sake of the story.

Working with, instead of against, her natural Green core traits led to a string of successes. In 1981 she was promoted to the CBS Morning News

-24-

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