Career Match: Connecting Who You Are with What You'll Love to Do

By Shoya Zichy; Ann Bidou | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Green/Gold Extroverts

YOU’RE NOT ONLY A GREEN, you also have strong secondary characteristics of the Gold personality. And you have tested as a Color Q Extrovert, which means you recharge your batteries by being with others, rather than being alone. You are compassionate, persuasive, loyal, and have a talent for predicting future trends.


You Overall

You are outgoing, sociable, warm, and articulate. Green/Gold Extroverts are gifted communicators with an unusual ability to influence. Those you admire receive your deep loyalty. In return, you expect equal appreciation. This can lead to frustration and disappointment.

You have an abundance of innate “emotional intelligence” and interact well with most Color types. You operate best in harmonious groups. Driven by intuition, foresight, and compassion, you excel at leading others to achieve their potential. You are exceptionally skilled at projecting the trends and pitfalls of the future.

People who are rude or bully others are a major irritant. You respond well to praise, but are easily hurt by criticism. This makes you appear touchy, as even the most well-intentioned criticism may fluster you. Actual conflict disturbs you (except when standing up to rude bullies, which you do with steely strength).

You are enthusiastic, with the energy to work on several projects at once. Decisive and often in a hurry, you can be more than a little impatient with

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